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National Law Enforcement Museum Acquires “Gangsters, Outlaws, and Lawmen” Artifacts

Collection includes objects related to the law enforcement posse that tracked down notorious criminal duo, Bonnie & Clyde

October 23, 2012

Washington, DCThe National Law Enforcement Museum participated in “Gangsters, Outlaws, and Lawmen,” a live auction hosted by RR Auctions on Sunday, September 30, in Nashua, New Hampshire. The auction had many high-profile objects up for bid, and the Museum acquired three different lots.

One of those lots includes a National Arms Co. Single Shot No. 2 Derringer, along with a badge and coin purse belonging to Pat Garrett, who was elected Sheriff of Lincoln County (NM) in 1880. The lot also includes a handwritten letter penned on the back of a mimeographed list of guns for sale and dated from the 1950s that refers to Garrett as the famous sheriff who killed Billy the Kid.
   
Derringer pistol used by Pat Garrett, 1870. 2012.40.1 Collection of the National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC
Badge: Deputy U.S. Marshal Pat Garrett, 1870. 2012.40.2 Collection of the National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC
 
Coin Purse used by Pat Garrett, 1870. 2012.40.3 Collection of the National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC 
 
The second lot includes the Deputy U.S. Marshal commission and badge that belonged to Ted Hinton, the youngest (and last surviving member) of the posse that ambushed and killed Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow in Louisiana in 1934.
   
Badge: Deputy U.S. Marshal Ted Hinton, 1941. 2012.40.5 Collection of the National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC
Commission appointing Ted Hinton as Deputy U.S. Marshal, April 16, 1941. 2012.40.6 Collection of the National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC

The final lot contains original 1930s Associated Press photos of a payroll robbery pursuit in New York. Two New York City patrolmen, Edwin V. Churchill and Walter J. Webb, were killed during the robbery. Their names are inscribed on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC (on panels 61 East: line 6, and 1 West: line 3, respectively).

In addition to hosting the auction, RR Auctions raffled off several other items—including a motorcycle that belonged to Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler—to raise more than $10,000 for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, the non-profit organization leading the efforts to build the National Law Enforcement Museum.

To date, the National Law Enforcement Museum has acquired more than 16,000 historical and contemporary artifacts, dating back to the 18th century. These recently acquired “Gangsters, Outlaws, and Lawmen” artifacts are now part of the most comprehensive collection of its kind in the United States, and will help the Museum tell the story of law enforcement in America—particularly how law officers dealt with violent crime during the late-19th and early-20th centuries.

“Though we have all heard of the notorious criminal pair Bonnie and Clyde, some of us don’t know who was responsible for catching them,” said National Law Enforcement Museum Executive Director Joe Urschel. “We are excited to share the stories of Frank Hamer, Ted Hinton, Pat Garrett, and other notable law officers when the Museum opens,” he said.

While the National Law Enforcement Museum's doors won't open until 2015, visit what will certainly become a not-to-be-missed Museum destination online at www.LawEnforcementMuseum.org.

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About the National Law Enforcement Museum
Authorized by Congress in the year 2000, the 55,000-square-foot National Law Enforcement Museum will be a mostly underground institution located adjacent to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC’s Judiciary Square. The Museum will tell the story of American law enforcement through high-tech, interactive exhibits, comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary artifacts, extensive resources for research, and diverse educational programming. Museum construction has commenced with a projected opening in early 2015. The Museum is an initiative of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a private non-profit [501(c)(3)] organization established in 1984. The Memorial Fund is dedicated to honoring the service and sacrifice of America’s law enforcement officers and to promoting officer safety. For more information about the National Law Enforcement Museum, visit www.LawEnforcementMuseum.org.

Steve Groeninger
steve@nleomf.org | (202) 737-7135