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August 2003

Police Officer Gregory Mosier

Kansas City (MO) Police Department

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) has announced the selection of Police Officer Gregory Mosier, of the Kansas City, MO, Police Department, as its Officer of the Month for August 2003. Officer Mosier is assigned to the Metro Patrol Division.

Originally planning a career in medicine, Greg Mosier was lured to law enforcement as he felt it afforded him the same opportunity to help our nation's citizens, but in a more challenging and exciting atmosphere. Knowing this, his friends and colleagues still affectionately refer to him as "Doc". Joining the department in 2000, Officer Mosier's personnel jacket reads like a text book every young law enforcement officer should read. Just as in medicine where the battles against disease and injury are fought by teams of professionals, Mosier knew that the battles against those determined to wreak havoc on our communities would require he and his partners to adopt that same team-work philosophy.

During the early morning hours of March 26, 2003, Officers Mosier, Aaron Shillcutt and David Ferber III were responding to a call for assistance when they heard screams and shattering glass. The residents of a home, which was engulfed in flames, were trapped inside and frantically calling for help. A family member had managed to escape, and was able to tell the officers the number of whereabouts of those trapped inside. The burglar bars on the windows, designed to keep the occupants safe from intruders, now held this family hostage. Although flames blocked both the front and rear doors, with little regard for their own safety, the three officers entered crawling under a wall of flames to reach the desperate victims inside.

Unable to visualize their whereabouts through the thick black smoke, Officers Mosier, Ferber & Shillcut inched their way in the direction of the terrified voices. They made this hazardous trip repeatedly until the two adults and five children trapped inside the inferno were rescued. Thrilled that all seven residents were safe but concerned that Officer Ferber was not present, Officers Mosier and Shillcut reentered the structure one last time. There they found Officer Ferber, suddenly overcome by smoke inhalation, struggling to crawl toward the exit. His was the eighth life saved that evening.

Not five months later, Officer Mosier and his partner Officer Hanson become involved in a situation which no doubt had impacted on the drug trade in Kansas City. Knowing that a large amount of methamphetamine was being distributed in the area, Officers Mosier & Hanson ran a license plate check on a vehicle whose driver was acting suspiciously and as they had surmised, the plates had been issued to different make and model vehicle. Realizing his vehicle was being observed by the officers, the suspected spun off making every effort to lose the tail. Once apprehended, they officers learned not only that the driver had a suspended driver's license, but that he was in fact a known narcotics distributor. A subsequent search revealed drug paraphernalia and quantities of methamphetamine.

Ironically, this team player has had to battle his toughest adversary alone. During a routine physical exam in the summer of 2002, Officer Mosier, then only 26 years old, was diagnosed with cancer. He underwent painful surgery and endured several cycles of chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Sergeant Sean Hess stated colleagues marveled at the fact that throughout this entire ordeal, "Officer Mosier maintained an upbeat, positive attitude and approached the situation with the same determination and tenacity that he exhibits at work. Greg is the very epitome of what a police officer should strive to be and is an example of what our nation needs and expects from its law enforcement officers."

Officer Mosier has been honored countless times for his actions in the line of duty and his commitment to his community. He has received twelve Supervisory Notices, two Letters of Appreciation, two Division Letters of Appreciation, one Chief's Letter of Appreciation, and seven Division Letters of Commendation. Of particular note, Officer Mosier's supervisors and peers unanimously selected him to receive the department's Watch-I Metro Patrol Officer of the Year award, presented to the officer "who demonstrates outstanding policing skills and positively interacts with his partner and with the community". Declared cancer free by his physicians, Mosier has returned to the job he loves.